Posted in Classroom, Literacy, Reflection, Slice of Life, Writing

Slice of Life 2018, Day 27: My Writing Identity

This morning, fresh off of Spring Break, I stood in my classroom as our Writing Workshop time began and I watched. The melodies of the Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone soundtrack competed with the rain beating against our classroom windows to set the tone for fantasy writing. Some students were already lost in their own worlds, furiously typing or scribbling across their pages. Others let their eyes roam around the room, taking a few minutes to think and plan. Some had worked on their stories over break. Others had forgotten we would even be writing fantasy stories when we returned. Each and every one of them, however, ended our “fast and furious flash draft day” having produced writing. Every single child, at their own pace and in their own way, wrote a piece of a fantasy story. And each one of them developed a bit of their writing identity today.

At the risk of sounding much older than my mid-thirties, I can’t help but think Why, back when I was in school… We didn’t have choice in our writing. We were taught the mechanics and the structure, but never the creativity or the passion. We sat in rows and outlined and drafted and made sure each paragraph met a specific set of requirements so that the teacher could easily assign a grade. We developed writing routines, but never reflected at all on why we wrote and who we were as writers–or who we could become.

As I think about myself as a writer today, I realize that my writing identity is still a work in progress (as I believe almost all writers must think). Yet over the past four years, since beginning the Slice of Life Challenge, I have realized many truths about myself as a writer and my writing identity:

  • I seldom write out my predraft ideas, but I rehearse them endlessly. I catch myself playing with words and ideas in my mind all day long. I plan out my writing in the shower, during my drive home, and while I put my kids to bed in the evening. By the time I sit down to write, I almost always have the words I want to begin with waiting on my fingertips.
  • Revision is not my strength. Though I always reread my work, I rarely make any drastic changes. Maybe this can be attributed to my rehearsal process, or maybe just my overall stubbornness. Whatever the reason, this is a part of the writing process that I know I have to focus on most heavily as a writer because it simply does not come naturally to me.
  • I am a late night writer. Late in the evening, once the kids have gone to bed and the house begins to quiet down, I am finally able to sit down and write. This is where I release the ideas that have been building all day and capture the stories I don’t want to forget.
  • I, like all writers, thrive on feedback. I’m incredibly shy about letting my family and friends read my writing, but Slice of Life has shown me the power of building a writing community and having critical friends review your work and provide support. This is a gift I really focus on passing on to my students, regularly setting aside opportunities for them to blog and share their writing with peers.
  • I have so much to learn from other writers. The more I write, the more I know I need to grow. I feed this need regularly by reading others’ blogs, reading published books and magazines, and thinking critically about where I am as a writer and where I want to grow.
  • Writing is an act that requires routine and dedication from me–and is worth every moment. Life has a way of becoming overwhelmingly demanding and busy, and writing is often the first thing to take a backseat for me (or to be pushed out of my life altogether). However, as I once again turn my focus toward writing and the joy and fulfillment it brings to me throughout the month of March, I realize that writing is more than just something I do; being a writer is something I am.

I have taught children to write for a long time now, and I myself have been learning to write for much longer than that. As I think about all of the things I have done–and all of the writing my students have created–writing identity is at the center of everything. It keeps us focused, helps us get through the difficult parts, and gives us a vision for where we want to be.

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slice of life

 

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Author:

Teacher, mentor, reader, writer, mother, wife Lover of good books, chocolate chip cookies, and sunny days

12 thoughts on “Slice of Life 2018, Day 27: My Writing Identity

  1. This line says it all: I realize that writing is more than just something I do; being a writer is something I am. It is incredible how much I learn every March. The end is always bittersweet! Thank you for sharing your reflections – I have enjoyed connecting this month.
    Clare

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What a very rich slice.
    I loved taking a peek into your classroom
    Each and every one of them, however, ended our “fast and furious flash draft day” having produced writing. Every single child, at their own pace and in their own way, wrote a piece of a fantasy story. And each one of them developed a bit of their writing identity today.
    And then your reflections of your own writing… I am so with you 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I really enjoyed your reflective piece. Through the SOL I certainly have learned so much from the other writers. I cannot wait to share it with some teachers in my district.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Isn’t it amazing how different one person’s writing process is from another’s? The way each one of us approaches a project; even how much we think and mull before we write varies. And yet, in some educational settings, teachers are still trying to do a one size fits all approach. I’m so glad you write, since you teach writing. And with Thomas Newkirk, I firmly believe every student should have at least one chance a year to write original fiction. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

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